In early February, Teton Science Schools teamed up with the Greater Yellowstone Coalition (GYC) to teach a group of 16 GYC members from around the United States more about the ecology of the Jackson Hole part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. This program was a double collaboration. The first element of the collaboration was Teton Science Schools working with an environmental advocacy group, the GYC, that is doing critical conservation work in this Ecosystem. The second element was Wildlife Expeditions and the Kelly Campus of Teton Science Schools collaborating to facilitate an unforgettable educational experience in this valley. The group arrived at the Kelly Campus on February 1st to spend the next three nights. Tracy Logan did a great job organizing ahead of time for the groups stay, Kate Muir Welsh and Stephanie Lewis oriented and facilitated the group while on the Kelly Campus, and Becky Turner produced outstanding meals. I heard from several of the trip participants that basing out of the Kelly Campus while exploring the valley for a couple days made them feel submersed in this place. Brad Cole (Wildlife Expedition biologist) and I led the group in exploring the valley and discussing its ecology, geology, and human history all day on February 2nd and 3rd. The wildlife watching was, of course, fabulous (we live a very special place). One day we even had a three- dog-day (i.e. seeing foxes, coyotes, and wolves).

After a few days experiencing Grand Teton National Park and the surrounding areas, the group left with even more reasons and increased value in continuing to support conservation efforts in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and in their regions around the country as well.