Teton Science Schools

Educating for a Vibrant World

  • Monday November 7, 2016
  • Young Women and Science: A Participant's Perspective

    Editor’s Note: The Young Women and Science program, now in its 26th year, was created to support the development of 8th and 9th grade students as leaders in the field of science. The program is designed to build science inquiry skills, knowledge of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, and leadership for a future generation of women scientists.
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  • Monday October 31, 2016
  • Behind the Science: Putting the Design Cycle to Work in the TSS Server Room

    “My dream is that someday we’re going to come in here on a Saturday night, order a bunch of pizzas, and unplug everything in this room. Then, we’re going to put it all back together and hope everything still works.” -Scott Daily, Information Technology Director
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  • Monday October 24, 2016
  • The Hunt

    I grew up in the suburbs of Chicago, where meat came from a Styrofoam container and milk from a carton. There are four generations between me and the last farmer in my family.
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  • Monday October 17, 2016
  • Barbed Wire, Moose, and Inspiration on a Wyoming Ranch

    We arrive at Cottonwood Ranch on a chilly, overcast October morning. We are met by owner Freddie Botur, who takes us into his ranch office. Tall and lean, Freddie is every bit the proverbial American cowboy. He is dressed in muddied work boots, blue jeans, and a full-brimmed hat and bandana.
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  • Monday October 10, 2016
  • TSS AmeriCorps at a Glance

    Deciding what to do with my life is a question that rolls through my mind every day. Have I fulfilled my life dream yet? Have I landed my dream job? Have I narrowed down what I want to do? These questions make many of us jump in our seats and make our palms sweat. Who would ever truly be able to answer these?
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  • Monday October 3, 2016
  • September Grizzlies

    We're rolling into Hayden Valley after a satisfying morning of elk bugling in the misty sagebrush plains just outside of Moose. It was a thrilling experience, but that was eight hours ago. As we made our way across the central Yellowstone Plateau, we saw a lot of lodgepole pine trees, but not a single mammal. I can sense my Wildlife Expedition guests wondering when we’re going to get around to the wolves and/or bears part of our “Wolf and Bear Expedition.”
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